Vinyards

The Vineyards

Not only is Simone Bergese producing world class wines from grapes grown in Braselton, Georgia, but also wines made from grapes grown all over California wine country. Below you will find a breakdown of the main viticulture areas we are working with.

 

Paso Robles

Geography

Situated directly between Los Angeles and San Francisco just inland from the Santa Lucia mountains, Paso Robles is one of California’s fastest growing wine regions. Geographically this area is divided into two main areas, the east and west sides of the Salinas River. The eastern side characterized by lower elevations and rolling hills; the western side characterized by steeper hillsides cut by small canyons.

Soils

The soil content of the Paso Robles AVA is extremely diverse. It is not uncommon for a single vineyard block to be home to multiple soil types. The underlying similarity in the terroir of this region is its particularly high concentration of calcareous soils. This characteristic results in a high soil PH not typical of other California viticulture areas.

Climate

While Paso Robles is known for its many distinct micro-climates, the region as a whole does share a few key characteristics. First and probably most important is the regions huge diurnal fluctuation. During summer days temperatures typically rise to between 85 and 105 degrees fahrenheit. At night the temperatures can fall to 40 or 50 degrees. This huge temperature swing is brought on by cool marine air flowing through the Templton Gap and down the centrally situated Salinas River. This key feature sets the Paso Robles AVA apart from all other California viticulture areas. The second shared and impactful characteristic is the regions dry fall months. The first rains do not typically fall in Paso Robles until mid November. This give the grapes of the region plenty of time to mature on the vine without risk of dilution.

Lake County

Geography

Lake County is located just north of Napa, encompassing the areas surrounding its namesake Clear Lake. The geography of Lake County is wildly varied based on the tumultuous tectonic history of the region. The region is sub-divided into four major AVA’s. The first being Clear Lake AVA which includes the body of water itself and surrounding region. The second being the aptly named High Valley AVA which lines the northern coast of the middle of Clear Lake. Third is the unique Red Hills AVA which is situated on the south western portion of the lake in the Mayacamas Mountains. Finally there is Guenoc Valley situated directly adjacent to Napa Valley in the southern portion of the county.

Soils

Just like the varied geographies of the region the soils vary substantially throughout Lake County. The soils of High Valley and Red Hills are defined by their volcanic nature. These well drained soils are comprised of porous red scoria, black obsidian and quarts. In the lower lying valley areas the soil is defined by the alluvial deposits of the ancients waters that flowed through the region. These soils are mostly Still and Lupoyoma loams, very well drained soils of clay sand and silt.

Climate

One of the most universal similarities of the various AVA’s in Lake County is the tremendous impact of the large central lake on their climate. This lake provides a year round temperature constant that help generate a substantial lake breeze to aid in cooling the valleys surrounding it at night. The constant convection provide by the lake in combination with great UV exposure in the area leads to rich tannic grapes. Thanks to the areas cold winters and dry summers, Lake County also has one of the lowest pesticide application rates in all of California.

Clarksburg

Geography

The Clarksburg AVA spans three counties in California‘s Sacramento Valley. Weighted drawbridges and swing bridges give access to the lush vineyards nestled among family farms that have been settled for generations.  The northern appellation border parallels the town of Freeport, while the southern border runs along Twin Cities Road, extending to the Sacramento Deep Water Channel.

Soils

Located in portions of Sacramento County, Solano County, and Yolo County, the Clarksburg AVA includes 64,640 acres (26,159 ha) near the town of Clarksburg. The growing region has dense clay and loam soils.

Climate

Warm summer days and cool breezy nights represent the climate in the Clarksburg wine appellation.

Clarksburg is located in the Northern California Central Valley and is often considered a part of the larger region of Lodi, however Clarksburg has very unique climate and geographical influences that distinguish the region as it’s own.  These specific influences make Clarksburg one of the best and most diverse wine grape growing regions in California:

  • There is limited summer fog influence giving the region the benefit of a few more hours of sunlight at the same monthly high temperature. This enables growth of a diverse portfolio of premium wine grapes, all achieved with less risk and higher probability for consistent quality.
  • Clarksburg’s climate has significant less probability for spring frost, allowing more consistent productivity, quality and evenly ripened premium wine grapes year after year!
  • Clarksburg experiences less rainfall during critical wine grape growing stages to ensure the highest most consistent quality wine grapes available in California.

Southern Piedmont

Geography

The Southern Piedmont region is situated at the southern stretch of the Blue Ridge Mountains and consists of rolling to hilly upland foothills with elevation ranging from 330 to 1,310 feet above sea level. The land area in Georgia constitutes 27% of the Southern Piedmont region and this is where our Estate vineyards are positioned here on property.

Soils

Soils in the Southern Piedmont are classified as well drained, with ample red clay subsoil to hold moisture between rains. Dominant parent rock includes biotite, gneiss, schist, slate, quartzite, phyllite, amphibolite and granite. Soils generally range from loamy to clay in texture, with pH from 4.5 to 6.5, and can be shallow to very deep, and severely eroded in some instances.

Climate

Temperatures are more moderate than those in the Southern Blue Ridge region (USDA hardiness zones 7a-8a) and rarely drop below 0° F, even in the northern stretch of the area. Late-spring frosts can still be a concern for vines not planted on sites with relative elevation that encourages cold air drainage. Although average annual precipitation ranges from 45 to 60 inches, drip irrigation is recommended due to hotter summer temperatures in this regions.